Former President George H. W. Bush expected to recover

After being admitted to the Texas Medical Center last Friday, former President George H. W. Bush is now predicted to be released within 72 hours. Bush served as the 41st president, taking office in 1989. 

AP Photo/Eric Gay, File
In this Dec. 7, 2009 file photo, former President George H.W. Bush and former first lady Barbara Bush arrive for a ceremony at the National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg, Texas. The former president is in stable condition at Texas Medical Center and expected to leave soon.

Former U.S. President George H. W. Bush is being treated at a Houston hospital and is in stable condition, the hospital said on Thursday.

"President Bush has been in and out of The Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center being treated," Bush's office said in a statement released by the hospital. "He is in stable condition, and is expected to be released within the next 72 hours."

Bush was admitted to the hospital last Friday, Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath told Fox News Channel's "Happening Now."

"They're just being extra cautious," McGrath said on Thursday.

The Houston Chronicle reported in February that Bush often uses a wheelchair.

Bush, a Republican and the 41st president, took office in 1989 and served one term in the White House.

The father of former President George W. Bush, he also served as a congressman, U.N. ambassador, envoy to China, CIA director and was vice president for two terms under Ronald Reagan.

As president, Bush routed Iraq after former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in 1990. His public approval ratings soared, but just 20 months later he was defeated in his re-election bid by Democrat Bill Clinton.

Until recently, Bush was known for an active lifestyle. He went skydiving to celebrate his 75th, 80th and 85th birthdays.

He met with former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev this month in Houston. In March, Bush formally endorsed Republican Mitt Romney for president.

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