Passenger jet engine catches fire prior to takeoff at Florida airport

Mike Dupuy/REUTERS
A still image from a handout video footage by Mike Dupuy, a passenger in another airplane, shows Dynamic International Airways' Boeing 767's engine on fire in Fort Lauderdale, Florida October 29, 2015. Passengers were forced to evacuate the Dynamic International Airways' Boeing 767 headed for Venezuela on Thursday after the plane's engine caught fire on the airport runway in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, officials said.

A jet plane's engine caught fire Thursday as it prepared for takeoff, and passengers had to quickly evacuate using emergency slides, officials said.

Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles said there were "some injuries" but offered no further details. Dozens of passengers could be seen in video footage gliding down the slides and running away from the plane to the terminal as fire crews rushed to put the blaze out.

It's not clear how many people were on board the Dynamic Airways flight headed to Caracas, Venezuela, from the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport. The Boeing 767 was set to take off at 12:45 p.m. when it caught fire, Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said.

Passengers on another plane on the runway recorded the fire and posted video to Twitter showing plumes of thick black smoke coming from the plane.

A pilot in an aircraft taxiing behind the Dynamic Airways plane reported fuel leaking from it before the fire, Bergen said.

An audio recording posted by WSVN showed that an air traffic controller told the pilot "a lot of fluid" was leaking from his left engine. The controller then urgently tells the pilot that the engine had caught fire and that he was dispatching firefighters.

Broward Aviation Department spokesman Allan Siegeo said the fire was extinguished by rescue teams on site.

The airport continued to operate shortly after the crash using another runway, but an airport spokeswoman later said the airport had been closed.

Dynamic said on its website its Boeing 767s can accommodate up to 250 people.

Dynamic is a small airline that connects Fort Lauderdale, New York, Venezuela and Guyana. Dynamic began servicing Caracas in July, after several other major airlines ended or slashed service to Venezuela over the government's refusal to pay an estimated $4 billion the carriers say they have trapped in the country.

For Venezuelans hoping to travel abroad, the options have been severely reduced to little-known carries such as Dynamic or domestic carriers, which due to the country's economic crisis, have struggled to import replacement parts.

A phone number listed on Dynamic's website was answered by a contracted reservation company which said it had no available numbers for the airline.

The National Transportation Safety Board is monitoring the situation and hasn't yet made a decision on whether to launch an investigation.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.