What did you miss? 10 headlines for Monday

Flooding. Twitter followers. Mars. Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events, and the stories that will be talked about today.

(AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
A car is submerged in floodwaters in Florence, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015 after steady rain left many roads impassable, while flooding continues in many parts of the state.

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. STORM BRINGS HISTORIC FLOODING TO SOUTH CAROLINA

Much of Columbia and a surrounding chunk of the state are in disarray after more than 18 inches of rain fell in spots and hundreds had to be rescued, including a mother and baby from a rooftop.

2. BAHAMAS SEARCH FOR LOST U.S. SHIP FINDS DEBRIS

Aircraft and ships searching off the Bahamas islands for a U.S. cargo ship that lost contact during Hurricane Joaquin have found more debris and clues but no definitive word yet on the fate of the vessel or the 33 people on board.

3. MASS SHOOTINGS GRAB HEADLINES, BUT SINGLE SHOOTINGS GO UNDER RADAR

There were 8,124 homicides by gun in 2014, according to the FBI's Crime in the United States report.  That works out to an average of 156 a week, more than 22 people shot to death every day across the country.

4. GUATEMALANS BURY KIN AFTER MUDSLIDE

Ismael Estrada lost a son and a granddaughter in the disaster that killed at least 131 people. He is still missing 19 family members and there may be as many as 300 missing.

5. WHY SYRIAN REFUGEES RETURN TO WAR ZONES IN HOMELAND

Many of them can't survive in exile, can't afford to pay smugglers to sneak them into Europe or are simply homesick.

6. NOBEL MEDICINE PRIZE WINNERS ANNOUNCED

William Campbell and Satoshi Omura are cited for discoveries concerning a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites, and Youyou Tu is rewarded for discoveries concerning a novel therapy against malaria. 

7. TWITTER LISTS: CANDIDATES FOLLOW THE LIKEMINDED

Looking at the Twitter accounts which presidential candidates follow can help us understand not only their personality and interests, but sometimes their strategy.

8. WHAT EFFECT STUDENT DEBT HAS ON FAMILIES

America's crushing surge of student debt, now at $1.2 trillion, has bred a disturbing new phenomenon: School loans that span multiple generations within families.  School loans increasingly belong to Americans over 40. This group accounts for 35 percent of education debt, up from 25 percent in 2004, according to the New York Federal Reserve.

9. PALESTINIAN YOUTH DIES AFTER WEST BANK CLASHES

Fears spread of a further escalation in violence that has already killed several Israeli civilians and wounded scores of Palestinian protesters.

10. WHY THe NAVY HELPS NASA PREPARE FOR MARS MISSION

NASA is tapping research from another outfit with experience sending people to the deep: the U.S. Navy submarine force. The space agency is working with a military laboratory at the submarine base in Groton, Conn., to measure how teams cope with stress during month-long simulations of space flight.

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