NBC cancels shows: 'Ironside' and 'Welcome to Family.' Why?

NBC cancels shows: After a month of low ratings, NBC canceled two of its new shows, "Ironside" and "Welcome to the Family." NBC will fill the Thursday slot with "Parks and Recreation" episodes.

NBC says it's canceling two freshman shows, "Ironside" and "Welcome to the Family."

"Ironside," starring Blair Underwood in an updated version of the Raymond Burr police drama, will air its final episode on Wednesday. Burr's "Ironside" aired from 1967-75, but low ratings will keep the new series to a total of four episodes.

"Welcome to the Family," a Thursday night comedy about a young couple's unplanned pregnancy, won't have a chance to say goodbye. Its last airing was this week.

"Ironside" and "Welcome To The Family" have been among NBC’s lowest-rated series this fall. In their most recent airings, Ironside logged a low 1.1  rating in the key 18-49 year old advertising demographic –  flat with the previous week and the same as "Sean Saves The World," while "Welcome To The Family" was up a tenth to a 0.9.

NBC is also keeping a close watch on "Sean Saves the World," but has ordered four new scripts, according to Deadline.

Replacing "Ironside" on Wednesday nights in November and December will be a mix of shows including episodes of "Dateline" and "Saturday Night Live" holiday-themed specials, NBC said.

"Parks and Recreation" episodes and specials will fill in for the departed "Welcome to the Family," the network said Friday.

Wednesday night TV is turning into a graveyard for new network shows. Earlier this month, ABC canceled "Lucky 7" after airing just two episodes. 

The lottery drama had the lowest average ratings of any new show in the fall, and the lowest of any Big 4 show overall.

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