Christina Hendricks on end of 'Mad Men' and her character's signature fashion

Christina Hendricks says the AMC drama has 'been a really special time for me.' Christina Hendricks stars as Joan Harris on the TV show.

Michael Yarish/AMC/AP
Christina Hendricks stars on 'Mad Men.'

Christina Hendricks says it's going to be difficult when the seventh and final season of "Mad Men" starts filming this November.

"I just want to milk it as long as possible," said Hendricks, who plays Joan Harris on the critically acclaimed AMC drama. "I want to really enjoy this last season every second that I can because it's been a really special time for me and a really special show."

Hendricks talked about the show's signature style, too, created by costumer designer Janie Bryant.

When Joan got married, she started wearing higher necklines, and power suits joined the character's rotation when she was promoted at the show's advertising agency, Hendricks said.

One constant since the AMC show debuted in 2007 has been Hendricks' updo.

"I think it also helps described her character because she's very sort of in control and likes things in order and everything just as it is," Hendricks said. "So why wouldn't her hair be?"

But Hendricks' style is decidedly different. When interviewed, she wore an Alice & Olivia zebra-printed top, teal Stella McCartney cigarette pants and neon-yellow Jimmy Choo heels.

"For me personally, I think I'm a little bit more playful than I think Joan is," she said. "I think that reflects in my clothing. I like things with a bit of whimsy and a bit of romance."

That hasn't kept some of the "Mad Men" mid-century style out of Hendricks' wardrobe, though.

"I never had a pencil skirt in my closet until I was on 'Mad Men,'" she said.

Her favorite outfit during the show's run? A knee-length, belted purple dress with a silk fuschia scarf, which was re-created for the Barbie collector doll.

"It has a little kick-pleat in the back," she said. "It's all about the detail. That's why I love all those vintage things. It's the details."

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