Love Eddie Van Halen? How you could buy his custom Charvel guitar.

About 300 guitars, including instruments associated with Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley and Eddie Van Halen, are heading to a New York City auction for late February. 

Greg Allen/Invision/AP/File
David Lee Roth, left, and Eddie Van Halen of Van Halen perform at the Nikon at Jones Beach Theater on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015, in Wantagh, N.Y. About 300 guitars, including instruments associated with Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley and Eddie Van Halen, are heading to a New York City auction. But get ready to splurge: you could pay anywhere between $20,000 to $200,000 for a guitar.

About 300 guitars, including instruments associated with Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley and Eddie Van Halen, are heading to a New York City auction.

Also on tap at Guernsey's sale Feb. 27 are acoustic guitars from the late 1800s and one played by actor Robert Blake in the film "In Cold Blood."

Among the top highlights is a 1952 Gibson Super 400 CES 7-String made for late studio guitarist Tony Mottola that could bring as much as $100,000. Mottola worked with such music greats as Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, Johnny Mathis and Rosemary Clooney.

There are two "In Cold Blood" guitars. One was used by Blake in the role of killer Perry Edward Smith in the 1967 Academy Award-winning movie based on the blockbuster book by Truman Capote, and the other is the actual guitar owned by Smith. They are being offered as one lot with a pre-sale estimate of $150,000 to $200,000.

A yellow-and-black Charvel guitar, customized for Eddie Van Halen in the 1980s, could bring $60,000 to $80,000. The original bill of sale made out to Van Halen is included.

A 1959 Gibson owned by Franny Beecher, the lead guitarist for the rock and roll band Bill Haley & His Comets, could fetch $20,000 to $25,000. It's one of only 57 made in 1959 in the natural finish.

Also in the auction catalog are four guitars associated with Eric Clapton, two of them signed; several Elvis Presley items, including a signed guitar; and Jimi Hendrix's guitar strap from Woodstock.

The sale also includes vintage guitars and mandolins made by string instrument maker Joseph Bohmann and more than 40 guitars from the late arranger and jazz musician Robert Yelin. About two dozen instruments owned by guitarist and singer-songwriter George Benson also are being offered.

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