Mariah Carey will perform in Las Vegas this spring

Carey recently released a new album titled 'Me. I Am Mariah... The Elusive Chanteuse' and has served as a judge on the Fox singing competition 'American Idol.' 

Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Mariah Carey performs at the 82nd Annual Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting ceremony in New York in 2014.

Mariah Carey is heading to Sin City.

Caesars Palace announced Thursday that the 44-year-old pop icon would open a series of shows May 16 at The Colosseum in Las Vegas. Carey has announced 18 performances so far.

The show, dubbed "MARIAH CAREY #1s," will feature the singer performing her 18 No. 1 singles, which include "We Belong Together," ''Hero," and "Vision of Love." She is one of the all-time best-selling acts in music.

Carey's announcement came after a so-so year for the multiplatinum, Grammy-winning star. Her latest album, "Me. I Am Mariah... The Elusive Chanteuse," was a commercial flop and she was criticized for her vocal performance during her recent tour. Her previous albums include "Merry Christmas," "Butterfly," "The Emancipation of Mimi," and "Memoirs of an Imperfect Angel."

Carey, a judge on "American Idol" for one season and the mother of 3-year-old twins, is following in the steps of Britney Spears, Celine Dion, and Shania Twain, who have performed their worldwide hits at Vegas residences. Other current and upcoming performers in Las Vegas include Rod Stewart, Elton John, and comedians Jerry Seinfeld, Andrew Dice Clay, and Kathy Griffin. Popular roadway shows such as "Rock of Ages" and "Million Dollar Quartet" have also made their way to Las Vegas.

The Caesars subsidiary that owns and manages most of its casino-hotels, including Caesars Palace where Carey will be performing, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Thursday. The company's CEO said in a statement that its lineup of entertainers would continue to perform as scheduled and customers should expect no interruption.

Tickets for Carey's show – on sale now – range from $55 to $250. She will perform nine shows in May and nine shows in June.

Carey will also release a new edition of "#1's," her 1998 compilation album, this year. It will include some new music.

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