Beyonce announces, releases new album 'Beyonce' on the same day

Beyonce's new self-titled album was released on iTunes on Dec. 13. The newest album is Beyonce's fifth.

Mark Humphrey/AP
Beyonce released a new album on Dec. 13.

Beyonce has released her new album in an unconventional way: She announced and dropped it on the same day.

The singer released "Beyonce" exclusively on iTunes early Friday. She mirrors how Jay Z released "Magna Carta Holy Grail" earlier this year – through a deal with Samsung where he gave the album to 1 million users of Galaxy mobile phones days before its official release.

Beyonce's fifth effort features 14 songs and 17 videos. Jay Z, Drake and Frank Ocean make guest appearances on the album, while the closing track, "Blue," features her daughter Blue Ivy. Justin Timberlake co-wrote the songs "Rocket" and "Partition" and Pharrell, Timbaland, Ryan Tedder, Miguel and Sia also co-wrote tracks.

The album caused a stir on social media websites, with fans posting about the release early Friday morning. Twitter said early data shows mentions of Beyonce spiked by 500,000-plus tweets after she announced the album. Diddy, Alicia Keys and Demi Lovato were among the celebrities tweeting about the topic.

Billboard said Friday that "Beyonce" will likely debut on top of its charts next week.

"Our early numbers are showing that this is likely heading toward a No. 1 debut on the Billboard 200 albums chart with only three days of the tracking week," said Bill Werde, the editor of Billboard. Billboard closes the tracking week on Sundays, and typical albums are released on Monday or Tuesday.

On Friday afternoon, the explicit and clean versions of "Beyonce" ranked No. 1 and No. 2 on the iTunes albums chart.

Along with Beyonce and Jay Z, other leaders in pop music have released albums in new ways recently: For her "Red" album last year, Taylor Swift had partnerships with Target, Walgreens and Papa John's; and Lady Gaga sold 440,000 copies of her "Born This Way" album on Amazon for just 99 cents when it was on sale for two days in 2011, helping the album sell 1.1 million in its debut week.

Werde said Beyonce's way of releasing the album "speaks to the change in the music business."

"I think on one hand what it really speaks to is the emerging power that artists have to go direct to fans," he said. "One of the things that's most impressive about this Beyonce release is she's controlling the conversation around it to a certain extent. She's controlling the initial experience that fans are having, so it's not about what critics are saying, it's not about, 'Here's what the album means' and explaining it, it's about, 'Hey, I put my art together for you, videos, songs, and you get to have the joy and experience of forming your own opinion on the work as I intended to be presented.'"

Beyonce calls the work a "visual album" and she filmed some of the videos in Paris, New York, Sydney, Rio de Janeiro and Houston, her hometown.

"I didn't want to release my music the way I've done it," she said in a statement. "I am bored with that. I feel like I am able to speak directly to my fans. There's so much that gets between the music, the artist and the fans. I felt like I didn't want anybody to give the message when my record is coming out. I just want this to come out when it's ready and from me to my fans."

Beyonce's last album was "4," released in 2011. It reached platinum success. "Beyonce" will be available in stores "in time for the holidays," her representative said.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Beyonce announces, releases new album 'Beyonce' on the same day
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Music/2013/1213/Beyonce-announces-releases-new-album-Beyonce-on-the-same-day
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe