Jennifer Nettles of Sugarland discusses her new album and motherhood

Jennifer Nettles is releasing a solo album this January. Jennifer Nettles and her Sugarland partner Kristian Bush are currently on hiatus.

John Shearer/Invision/AP
Jennifer Nettles attends at the Billboard Music Awards.

Jennifer Nettles has finished the music, chosen a cover photo and now she has a release date for her debut solo album – Jan. 14.

Nettles revealed the date Monday night in an interview at the ASCAP Country Awards, making one of many appearances this week. The Sugarland singer kicked things off with a listening party for her new Rick Rubin-produced album, "That Girl," on Sunday. She will attend the Country Music Association Awards on Wednesday and will serve as host during the taping Friday of the CMA's Christmas show.

Expect to see a different side of the 39-year-old singer as she reveals her new music. They're the first without her Sugarland partner Kristian Bush. The Grammy Award-winning duo is on hiatus.

"I think this album so far for me musically has been the most intimate and personal ... musically and vocally," Nettles said. "I think it's way more intimate to me and way more personal in the sense that when you collaborate, that's the nature of collaboration, you're affecting each other, and playing with and inspiring each other, and yet there are things that one may not get to do or want to do when collaborating."

The week will mark Nettles' first real return to the spotlight since the birth of her son, Magnus, 11 months ago. Motherhood and marriage have changed Nettles, and she says that will be reflected on "That Girl."

"I'm able to show a side that I think's more womanly," Nettles said. "I think it's more mature, and so that's big for me. I think it gives you perspective all around, not just musically but also in my career. I think you get super-efficient because you have to be. You don't worry about things that were super-important before because you have a baby and you just burn that underbrush out. You feel like a huntress."

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