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'Three Identical Strangers' is a true story that could only be believed because it actually happened

( PG-13 ) ( Monitor Movie Guide )

In 1980, through sheer coincidence, 19-year-olds Robert Shafran and Eddy Galland discovered they are identical twins separated at birth. When their story was trumpeted in the media, 19-year-old David Kellman saw the photos and realized he was their triplet.

Courtesy of Neon
Eddy, David, Bobby in 'Three Identical Strangers.'

I sincerely hope that no one tries to dramatize Tim Wardle’s documentary “Three Identical Strangers” as a fictional film. It’s a true story that could only be believed because it actually happened. In 1980, through sheer coincidence, 19-year-olds Robert Shafran and Eddy Galland discovered they are identical twins separated at birth. When their story was trumpeted in the media, 19-year-old David Kellman saw the photos and realized he was their triplet. All three boys had been adopted from the same agency by separate pairs of parents who knew nothing of the babies’ circumstances.

To reveal much more than this would spoil the experience, but suffice to say this is a movie that begins like a News of the Weird anecdote and turns increasingly dark. It brings the nature versus nurture debate into shattering focus. Grade: B+ (Rated PG-13 for some mature thematic material.)

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