‘Wonder Woman’ stirs social media as most tweeted-about film of 2017

The film depicting Amazonian heroine ‘Wonder Woman’ has shattered Hollywood’s glass ceiling, simultaneously becoming the best-selling female-directed film in its opening weekend and the most tweeted-about film in 2017. 

Clay Enos/Warner Bros. Entertainment/AP
This image released by Warner Bros. Entertainment shows Gal Gadot in a scene from "Wonder Woman." The film has broken several notable records, including the most successful female-directed film in its opening weekend, generating $103 million domestically.

After breaking a historic box office record, "Wonder Woman" has broken another record, becoming the most tweeted-about movie of 2017 in the United States.

"Wonder Woman" has garnered more than 2.19 million tweets so far this year, according to exclusive information obtained by Variety from Twitter.

Those 2.19 million tweets make "Wonder Woman" the most popular movie on Twitter of 2017, surpassing "La La Land" and "Beauty and the Beast," which topped the box office this year with over $1.2 billion internationally, but came in third place on Twitter.

Aside from the film as a whole, Wonder Woman, also known as Diana Prince, also ranks the most tweeted-about film character of the year. Gal Gadot plays the title heroine in the flick. Her co-star Chris Pine's character, Steve Trevor, currently ranks as the third most tweeted-about film character of 2017. Batman came in second place.

The film's most tweeted names are Ms. Gadot in first place, then director Patty Jenkins and then Mr. Pine coming in third.

All of Gadot's most popular tweets from her personal account were the release of promotional materials for the film – two trailers and the movie poster. Other popular tweets about "Wonder Woman" came from various accounts such as Stephen Colbert, Joss Whedon, Chris Evans and the original Wonder Woman, Lynda Carter.

"Wonder Woman" has shattered the glass ceiling, becoming the most successful female-directed film with a $103 million opening weekend domestically, and is set to dominate again this upcoming weekend.

Internationally, the Warner Bros. and DC Comics flick slayed, bringing the total global opening to over $220 million – and counting. It's also the third best opening of all time in Imax theaters. The blockbuster marks a major turning point for the industry's gender politics, as the most expensive film ever from a female director with Ms. Jenkins getting a $150 million budget to produce the film.

"Wonder Woman" has received vastly rave reviews with Variety's critic writing, "Patty Jenkins and Gal Gadot breathe some fresh air into the DC film universe."

On the red carpet at the world premiere, Gadot spoke to Variety about the industry's progress in regards to big-budget superhero films, saying, "I think that it's so important that we have also strong female figures to look up to, and Wonder Woman is an amazing one. It's great that after 75 ... years that this character had been around, finally she gets her own movie."

Well, if the box office and Twitter are any indication, Wonder Woman should count on getting another one of her own movies sooner rather than later.

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