The Culture Movies

'Newtown' is about people trying to make sense out of senselessness

Kim A. Snyder's documentary shows how the Connecticut community coped with the aftermath of the 2012 shooting.

Image from the movie 'Newtown.'
Courtesy of Derek Wiesehahn and Abramorama
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Caption
( Unrated )
  • Peter Rainer
    Film critic

Kim A. Snyder’s documentary “Newtown” is often extraordinarily difficult to watch and yet, as I watched it, I felt a visceral need to see up close how the Connecticut community coped with the aftermath of the 2012 shooting that left 20 students and six staff members dead at Sandy Hook Elementary School (and, scandalously, did not lead directly to changes in gun-control laws).

What comes through is that the survivors have in no sense reached “closure” – that meaningless word. This is a movie about people trying to make sense out of the senselessness of what happened. Grade: B+ (Unrated.)

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