Vivien Leigh's archive will be on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum

Vivien Leigh's personal letters, annotated film and theater scripts, and more will be on display at the British museum. Vivien Leigh starred in films such as 'Gone with the Wind' and 'A Streetcar Named Desire.'

New Line Cinema/AP
Vivien Leigh (center right) won an Oscar for her role in the 1939 film 'Gone with the Wind.'

Britain's Victoria & Albert Museum says it has acquired the archive of "Gone With the Wind" star Vivien Leigh, including personal diaries and letters to her husband, Laurence Olivier.

The London museum said Wednesday it bought the archive from Leigh's grandchildren for an undisclosed sum.

The trove includes photographs, annotated film and theater scripts, and thousands of letters from Winston Churchill, Marilyn Monroe, Noel Coward and others.

There are more than 200 letters exchanged with Olivier, to whom Leigh was married for 20 years.

The British-born star won an Academy Award for playing iron-willed Southern belle Scarlett O'Hara in the U.S. Civil War epic "Gone With the Wind." She died of tuberculosis in 1967, aged 53.

Some of the material will go on display at the museum this fall.

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