Lady Gaga loses No.1 sales spot to Eminem

Lady Gaga: Her new album, "ARTPOP," debuted at No. 1 last week with 258,000 copies sold. But sales of the new Lady Gaga album fell 82 percent this week. Will Muppets' Holiday Spectacular give Gaga a boost?

Rapper Eminem climbed back to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 album chart on Wednesday after ousting last week's chart-topper Lady Gaga.

Eminem's "The Marshall Mathers LP 2" reclaimed the top spot on the weekly album chart with sales of 120,000, according to figures from Nielsen SoundScan.

The record had debuted at No. 1 following its release on Nov. 5 with sales of 792,000 copies, the second-largest opening week this year behind Justin Timberlake's "The 20/20 Experience," which opened with 968,000 copies in March.

Lady Gaga's latest effort "ARTPOP" debuted at No. 1 last week with 258,000 copies, but sales dropped by 82 percent in its second week, as the record fell to No. 8 in the chart with 46,000 units sold.

But Lady Gaga's new album may get a sales boost from her Thursday night ABC-TV special: "Lady Gaga & the Muppets' Holiday Spectacular," which EW described as "a cross-promotional commercial."

Five new debuts entered the top 10 of the Billboard 200 this week, led by heavy metal rockers Five Finger Death Punch at No. 2 with "The Wrong Side of Heaven and the Righteous Side of Hell Vol. 2."

The soundtrack from the latest "Hunger Games" film, "Catching Fire," featuring songs by Coldplay, Lorde and Christina Aguilera, landed at No. 5.

The film starring Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence, stormed the worldwide box office with $307 million last week.

Rock band Daughtry came in at No. 6 with "Baptized," rapper Yo Gotti notched No. 7 with his latest record "I Am" and the 25th anniversary edition of the "Cities 97 Sampler" compilation, featuring alternative rock artists such as Capital Cities, Fun. and Matchbox Twenty, rounded out the top 10.

On the digital songs chart, which measures song downloads, Eminem's "The Monster" featuring Rihanna kept its reign at No. 1 with 241,000 downloads. New Zealand singer Lorde's "Royals" climbed one spot to No. 2 and OneRepublic's "Counting Stars" fell one spot to No. 3.

Overall album sales for the week ending Nov. 24 totaled 5.29 million, down 46 percent from the comparable week in 2012, according to Billboard. (Editing by Eric Kelsey and Gunna Dickson)

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.