Hayden Panettiere confirms: She's engaged to Olympian Wladimir Klitschko

Hayden Panettiere told Kelly Ripa she's engaged to longtime boyfriend Wladimir Klitschko, an Olympic boxer, but Panettiere and Klitschko haven't set a wedding date.

Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/File
Actress Hayden Panettiere attends the Versus Versace and Capsule Collection fashion show at the 69th Regiment Armory, in New York, May 15, 2013.
Davre Allocca/Starpix/AP/File
Actress Hayden Panettiere and boxer Wladimer Klitschko arrive at the Tribecca Film Festival in New York, April 23, 2011. Panettiere and Klitschko are engaged, Hayden confirmed Wednesday.

"Nashville" star Hayden Panettiere (pan-uh-tee-EHR') is confirming her engagement to Olympic boxer Wladimir Klitschko (VLAD'-uh-meer KLICH'-koh).

Appearing on Wednesday's "Live with Kelly and Michael," the 24-year-old actress was flashing a large diamond ring that prompted host Kelly Ripa to inquire what it might signify.

Panettiere confirmed she's engaged as the studio audience cheered. She added that she and longtime boyfriend Klitschko haven't set a wedding date.

Panettiere made her entrance on the show wearing a huge, live boa constrictor meant to startle host Michael Strahan, who is not a snake fancier.

Clearly Panettiere's ring, and big news, upstaged even her pet reptile.

On ABC's "Nashville," Panettiere plays scheming up-and-coming country music star Juliette Barnes.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.