Pia Zadora ordered into alcohol, anger management rehab

Pia Zadora, actress and singer, was charged with domestic abuse after spraying her teenage son with a water hose. A judge ordered Pia Zadora to complete an alcohol and anger counseling program or go to jail for 30 days.

 A judge on Thursday ordered singer-actress Pia Zadora to complete alcohol and impulse control counseling.

The entertainer, whose career peaked in the 1980s, was arrested in May after police say she sprayed her teenage son with a hose in an attempt to get him to go to bed.

A Las Vegas judge told Zadora that she'll face 30 days in jail if she fails to seek help, the Las Vegas Sun reported.

Zadora was charged with domestic abuse and coercion after a disturbance that began with her attempt to hustle the 16-year-old boy to bed so she could get some rest.

Police reports say the one-time blond bombshell turned a watering hose on her 16-year old son and tried to rip the phone from his hands when he called police.

Zadora told police she thought he was calling the authorities to avoid his bedtime.

The Las Vegas Sun reported:

"The police interviewed Zadora, who admitted to drinking alcohol and confirmed the cause of the initial confrontation. Zadora said she was upset by her son’s defiance and may have scratched her husband when he tried to wrestle the hose away from her. She also admitted to trying to take the phone from her son when he called 911, because, she told police, he was unnecessarily bothering the authorities and avoiding going to bed."

On Friday, the Las Vegas restaurant Piero's Italian Cuisine announced that Zadora would begin an indefinite residency, performing at "Pia's Palace" on weekends.

A former child actress on Broadway, Zadora has been most-often honored by the Razzies, an Academy Awards spoof that hands out prizes for Hollywood's lousiest movies on the eve of the Oscars. She won "worst new star of the decade" in 1990.

Her most memorable moment was likely her star turn in a 1982 Golden Globe pay-to-play scandal.

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association named her rising star of the year after her then-husband wined and dined many voting members at his casino in Las Vegas. CBS dropped the awards show soon after.

When her film career failed to take off, Zadora became a singer of popular standards.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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