Obama: Carole King concert at White House

Obama: Carole King will be presented the Gershwin Prize by President Obama during a White House concert. In addition to Carole King, the concert will include Gloria Estefan, Billy Joel, Jesse McCartney, Emeli Sandé, James Taylor, and Trisha Yearwood.

REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Carole King performs at the 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in Los Angeles April 18, 2013.

President Barack Obama is putting on a show at the White House next week for singer-songwriter Carole King.

She is the first woman to receive the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song from the Library of Congress.

The White House says Obama will present the award to Carole King during a concert Wednesday. The program will include performances by King, Gloria Estefan, Billy Joel, Jesse McCartney, Emeli Sandé, James Taylor, and Trisha Yearwood.

King's hits during five decades of songwriting include "You've Got a Friend," ''So Far Away" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman."

Wednesday's concert will be the latest in the "In Performance at the White House" series.

According to PBS, the "In Performance at the White House" series:

"Began with an East Room recital by the legendary pianist Vladimir Horowitz in 1978, and since then has embraced virtually every genre of American music: pop, country, gospel, jazz and the blues among them. The series was created to showcase the rich fabric of American culture in the setting of the nation's most famous home. Past programs have showcased such talent as the United States Marine Band, singer Natalie Cole, the best of Broadway musicals and the Dance Theatre of Harlem."

"Stevie Wonder In Performance at the White House: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize" was the first "In Performance at the White House" program during President Barack Obama's Administration.

In April, the theme was "Memphis Soul," and featured Al Green, Mavis Staples, Ben Harper, Alabama Shakes, Justin Timberlake, and Joshua Ledet.

The Carole King concert will be streamed live on www.whitehouse.gov.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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