Peter Banks dies: Lead guitarist and founding member of 'Yes'

Peter Banks dies: A founding member of the British rock band, Yes, passed on March 7. Peter Banks was consided a pioneer of progressive rock guitar.

Peter Banks, a founding member of the British progressive rock band "Yes" and its original guitarist, has died at his home in London. He was 65.

A statement on Banks' website said he died on March 7 and was found in his home after he failed to show up for a recording session.

Widely considered a pioneer of progressive rock guitar, his loss was mourned in a statement by fellow band members from Yes, which was formed in 1968. "We are deeply saddened to learn about the passing of fellow bandmate and founding Yes member, Peter Banks," the statement said.

"He was a huge piece of the fabric that made Yes what it is, and our thoughts, sincere condolences and prayers are with him and his family. Peter, we shall miss you greatly," the statement said.

Former bandmate Billy Sherman wrote on his Facebook page:

"Rest In Peace..... Peter Banks. Peter very recently played on the new "prog collective 2" project I'm writing/producing, as well as the "days between stations" record I worked on. As a Yes fan... this is sad news indeed. It was an honor to work with Peter on many productions. He will be missed !!!"

According to an official press release, Banks performed on the first two albums from Yes, which was known for its symphonic style and complex instrumentation.
Banks went on to form Flash and released three well-received albums with that group before forming another new band called Empire.
He released five solo albums over the course of his career. ( Editing by Todd Eastham)

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.