Angus T. Jones describes 'Two and a Half Men' as 'filth'

Angus T. Jones is now campaigning against the TV show in which he stars as 'Jake' on 'Two and a Half Men.' In a video, Angus Jones asks viewers, 'Please stop filling your head with filth.'

REUTERS/Phil McCarten
Cast member Angus T. Jones from the CBS series "Two and a Half Men." Jones has urged viewers to change the channel saying his new-found religious beliefs are at odds with his job playing a fun-loving teen on the popular show.

 The teenage actor who plays the half in the hit CBS comedy "Two and a Half Men" says it is "filth" and through a video posted by a Christian church has urged viewers not to watch it.

Nineteen-year-old Angus T. Jones has been on the show, which used to feature bad-boy actor Charlie Sheen and remains heavy with sexual innuendo, since he was 10 but says he doesn't want to be on it anymore.

"Please stop watching it," Jones said. "Please stop filling your head with filth."

Jones plays Jake, the son of Jon Cryer's uptight divorced chiropractor character, Alan, and the nephew of Sheen's hedonistic philandering music jingle writer character, Charlie. Sheen, who has publicly criticized CBS, was fired and replaced by Ashton Kutcher, who plays billionaire Walden.

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In the video posted by the Forerunner Christian Church in Fremont, California, Jones describes a search for a spiritual home. He says the type of entertainment he's involved in adversely affects the brain and "there's no playing around when it comes to eternity."

"You cannot be a true God-fearing person and be on a television show like that," he said. "I know I can't. I'm not OK with what I'm learning, what the Bible says, and being on that television show."

CBS and the show's producer Warner Bros. Television had no comment Monday.

"Two and a Half Men" survived a wild publicity ride less than two years ago, when Sheen was fired for his drug use and publicly complained about the network and the show's creator, Chuck Lorre. Sheen later said he wasn't still angry at the sitcom's producers and the network and acknowledged he would have fired himself had he been in their shoes.

The show was moved from Monday to Thursday this season, and its average viewership has dropped from 20 million an episode to 14.5 million, although last year's numbers were somewhat inflated by the intense interest in Kutcher's debut. It is the third most popular comedy on television behind CBS's "The Big Bang Theory" and ABC's "Modern Family."

The actors on "Two and a Half Men" have contracts that run through the end of this season.

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Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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