Holiday 2016: ideas for the foodie on your gift list

From cookbook suggestions to pretty ceramics to chocolate subscriptions, a few festive finds for the food lover in your life.

The Runaway Spoon
A few ideas for all the foodies on your holiday gift list.

Holiday shopping season is upon us once again, and I love to share gift ideas for the food lovers in your life. As always, these are just some ideas about personal favorites – no one has asked me to promote any products.

I’m a huge fan of Melissa Bridgman’s pottery, and she now offers a fabulous subscription service for the gift that keeps on giving. The coffee or tea lover in your life will thrill over a new mug each month. Memphian Brit McDaniel makes beautiful pottery that’s also charmingly functional, like this salad bowl with a perfect little dip to rest the tongs on. If you’ve got a biscuit baker in your life, this lovely ceramic biscuit cutter from Heirloomed would make a lovely gift (that might keep on giving if they make the biscuits for you!). Kentucky’s Pomegranate makes absolutely beautiful linens, from napkins to potholders, and this fabulous apron.

Judy Pound Cakes make wonderfully flavorful and rich pound cakes that make wonderful gifts, particularly for a hostess. I’m particularly fond of the apricot almond flavor. Edwards Virginia Hams suffered a devastating fire earlier this year, but thankfully they are up and running again, so their lovely Tale of Two Hams package is available. It’s a small country ham and small city ham perfect for holiday parties. A pretty jar of French Broad Chocolates Chocolate Sip makes a lovely little gift perfect for chilly holiday nights, or go all out with a chocolate subscription.

Chicken is a meal staple for so many people, so Cynthia Graubart’s new cookbook Chicken is sure to be useful and welcomed. The Chubby Vegetarian Cookbook is a fantastically creative cookbook full of wonderful ideas, for vegetarians, vegetable lovers or anyone trying to expand horizons in the kitchen. Big breakfast lovers will devour Big Bad Breakfast from John Currence, chef of the restuarants by the same name. For the true cookbook lover on your list, Vivian Howard’s beautiful Deep Run Roots will be this year’s prized gift.

But maybe the best gift of all is giving on behalf of someone you love to someone in need. There are so many great organizations to give to that will create special cards you can wrap up for your recipient or have it sent directly to them. Women for Women International is an amazing organization that works to raise women and girls out of poverty around the world. They have a whole selection of gift donations.

And as food banks are under more strain than ever, Give-A-Meal through Feeding America to a family in need in honor of a family you love. And remember your local food bank with monetary donations or canned goods.

For some more ideas about my favorite fun kitchen finds, book and movies – check out The Spoon’s Store, powered by Amazon. Just click on the box on the right hand side of the page.

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