Persimmon quick bread

Persimmons are a rare in-season fruit in winter. They can be sliced and added to salads and side dishes, or puréed and used in quick breads and muffins.

The Runaway Spoon
In-season persimmons bring a splash of color to a winter kitchen. Purée the sweet fruit and use to make a quick bread.

Persimmons are the brightest spot in the barren, winter "fruitscape." Sure, citrus is there, but I miss the reds, pinks, peach, blues, plums, purples and greens of summer bounty.

But then there are these bright beauties, orange and smooth and shiny, with their frilly green caps. I have a tendency to overbuy, because I am so excited about a fresh winter fruit. And I am not always sure what to do with them. Sometimes they sit happily on my counter, making me smile at their lovely color and sheen until I’ve missed their usable moment. 

My simple, delicious solution is to make this slightly sweet, moist, persimmon-rich bread.

Fuyus are the squat persimmons, and best for baking. Cut out the green stem end, cut into chunks and purée them in the blender or food processor. Persimmon bread is a particular treat slathered with Meyer Lemon Curd.

Persimmon Bread

Makes 1 loaf

1 cup persimmon puree (from 3 – 4 ripe Fuyu persimmons)

2 tablespoons water

1/2 cup butter, softened

1 cup sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla

3 eggs

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degree F.  Grease a standard loaf pan.

Cut out the stem of each persimmon and cut into chunks.  Purée the persimmons in a food processor or blender with 2 tablespoons water.

Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add vanilla. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the persimmon purée and beat until thoroughly combined. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, salt, and baking soda. Add flour mixture to batter and beat until smooth.

Pour into a loaf pan and bake at for 50-60 minutes, until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool well before slicing.  Well wrapped, the bread will keep for a few days.

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