George Alexander Louis: His Royal Highness Prince of Cambridge has a name!

George Alexander Louis: William and Kate have announced the royal baby's name – His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge.

AP Photo
His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge: A selection of British daily newspapers on Wednesday July 24, 2013 headlining the news of the birth of a son to Prince William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

The royal baby has a name. 

"The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are delighted to announce that they have named their son George Alexander Louis. The baby will be known as His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge," said a press release from the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's official website. 

Moments ago, a tweet sent out by the Clarence House, the official twitter handle for news about Prince William, also made the name announcement.  

The Internet has been quick to react (probably because we're all tired of repeating "royal baby" as a place keeper).

The @ClarenceHouse tweet has already been retweeted close to 5,000 times and that number is multiplying fast. 

Wikipedia's entry for the line of succession to the throne already lists "Prince George of Cambridge" as third in line behind his dad William and grandpa Prince Charles. 

Six previous British kings have been named George, and the name was a favorite of British bookmakers in the run-up to Wednesday's announcement.

For now, the baby is expected to stay out of the spotlight after making his first "public appearance" in the arms of his parents outside of London's St. Mary's Hospital on Tuesday.

After leaving the hospital, the couple introduced their son Wednesday to great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II, who was keen to see the baby before she starts her annual summer vacation in Scotland later this week.

Then the young family headed to see Kate's parents in their village near London.

Now that Kate and William have chosen a name, they are expected to soon choose a photographer for the baby's first official portrait.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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