He takes a photo of her with him everywhere he goes

This widower always has a photo of his late wife with him. This is their story. 

Twitter

A snapshot of a man dining alone, gazing at a photo of his late wife, has the Internet in tears.

The photo – which shows an elderly gentleman seated at an In-N-Out Burger in California, pausing between bites to gaze at a picture of he and wife together perched on his table – went viral after it was tweeted this week.

It quickly made it over to reddit, where commenters were moved to moistened eyes, and many redditors to share about their own husbands and wives.

"I was gonna reply to your comment earlier but instead I got up to spend the last 5 minutes with my husband while he was getting ready for work," wrote one commenter. 

But the story doesn't end there.

One week prior, someone else had posted a photo of the same man at the same table. He had a different photo, but it was the same woman.

The person who took the photo said they sat and talked with him. This is what he said:

As I had assumed, she was his wife. But I didn’t expect such an interesting story. They met when they were both 17. They dated briefly, then lost contact when he went to war and her family moved. But he said he thought about her the entire war. After his return, he decided to look for her. He searched for her for 10 years and never dated anyone. People told him he was crazy, to which he replied “I am. Crazy in love”. On a trip to California, he went to a barber shop. He told the barber how he had been searching for a girl for ten years. The barber went to his phone and called his daughter in. It was her! She had also been searching for him and never dated either. 

He proposed immediately and they were married for 55 years before her death 5 years ago. He still celebrates her birthday and their anniversary. He takes her picture with him everywhere and kisses her goodnight.

The older man also offered this: "Tell your wife that you love her everyday. And be sure to ask her, have I told you that I love you lately?"

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