Actress Megan Fox has new baby – it's a boy

Actress Megan Fox, "Transformer" star, had the baby in September and released the news on Facebook yesterday: it's a boy named  Noah Shannon Green.

AP Photo/Paramount Pictures, Jaimie Trueblood
Actress Megan Fox – left, with Shia LaBeouf in "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" – has a new baby boy.

Actress Megan Fox announced Oct. 16, 2012, that she had given birth to a baby boy in September –  her first child, with husband Brian Austin Green.

The "Transformers" movie series star made the announcement on her official Facebook page, saying she wanted to release the news herself.   

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"I gave birth to our son Noah Shannon Green on September 27th. He is healthy, happy, and perfect. We are humbled to have the opportunity to call ourselves the parents of this beautiful soul and I am forever grateful to God for allowing me to know this kind of boundless, immaculate love," the actress said.   

Ms. Fox and television actor Green married in June 2010 in Hawaii after a four-year engagement that included a brief split in 2009.   

Green, who rose to fame in the 1990s series "Beverly Hills, 90210" and will be seen in the upcoming comedy series "The Wedding Band," has a son, Kassius, from a previous relationship with his "90210" co-star Vanessa Marcil.      

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