What does the new 'Ant-Man' trailer reveal? Watch it here

'Ant-Man' stars Paul Rudd as Scott Lang, a former criminal who is persuaded to assume the identity of Ant-Man, and Michael Douglas as scientist Hank Pym.

A trailer has been released for the upcoming movie focusing on the Marvel superhero Ant-Man.

The film stars Paul Rudd as Scott Lang, who is reportedly a thief that scientist Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) tries to convince to become the superhero. In the comic books, Hank creates a serum that makes people tiny and builds the Ant-Man costume, becoming Ant-Man himself for a time, and Scott later steals the suit from him. However, according to Rolling Stone, in the movie Hank recruits Scott to take on the superhero identity.

“The World’s End” director Edgar Wright was originally set to direct “Ant-Man” but left the project and Peyton Reed of “Yes Man” and “The Break-Up” is now at the helm. “Ant-Man” also co-stars “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” actress Evangeline Lilly as Hope Van Dyne, who in the comic books is Hank Pym’s daughter, and actor Corey Stoll of “This Is Where I Leave You” as Darren Cross, who according to Entertainment Weekly is the villain of the film and later becomes Yellowjacket. 

In the trailer, Scott is shown surrendering to police and Hank tries to convince him to take on the Ant-Man identity. “Don’t let anyone tell you that you have nothing to offer,” he says. “This is your chance to earn that look in your daughter’s eyes, to become the hero that she already thinks you are.” (Comic book fans will remember that Cassie Lang, Scott’s daughter, later becomes a superhero herself.) 

“Huh,” Scott responds. 

The new clip also pokes fun at the superhero. “One question – is it too late to change the name?” Scott asks Hank. 

“Ant-Man” will be released on July 17 in a summer movie season that will also see the arrival of the “Avengers” sequel, “The Avengers: Age of Ultron,” in May.

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