'Married With Children': Will it get a spin-off?

A spin-off TV series based on the 'Married With Children' character Bud Bundy (David Faustino) could reportedly be in the works. 'Married With Children' also starred Ed O'Neill, Katey Sagal, and Christina Applegate.

Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
'Married... with Children' cast members Christina Applegate (l.), Katey Sagal (second from l.), David Faustino (second from l.), and Ed O'Neill (r.) attend the ceremony for Katey Sagal's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Is a spin-off of the Fox sitcom “Married With Children” being developed?

According to E!, Sony Pictures Television is taking out a pitch for a show that would center on the character of son Bud Bundy, portrayed by actor David Faustino in the original TV show. “Married” ran from 1987 to 1997 and starred Ed O’Neill of “Modern Family,” “Sons of Anarchy” actress Katey Sagal, Christina Applegate of the 2013 movie “Anchorman 2,” and Faustino. Sagal and O'Neill were nominated multiple times for Golden Globes for their acting on the show and the series itself was nominated for best comedy or musical TV series.

Speaking with E! at the ceremony for Sagal receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Applegate said, “We're going to do something with Dave, maybe. I don't know if it will be in character. But I don't really know. I don't know what that's going to be. I don't know if I'm allowed to speak on that at all. So I should probably stop talking about it right now.” 

Faustino commented on the story on his Facebook page, referencing a Hollywood Reporter article about the news. 

“So..this story just dropped on the Hollywood Reporter today... (Would be nice, wouldn't it?)” he wrote. 

As noted by TV Guide, if the project moved forward, it would be yet another ‘90s sitcom returning to the small screen – the show “Girl Meets World,” which centers on the daughter of “Boy Meets World” main characters Cory (Ben Savage) and Topanga (Danielle Fishel) debuted this summer, and according to TV Guide, "Full House" original star John Stamos is "leading the charge" for a revival of the show and the creator of “Full House,” Jeff Franklin, as well as the show’s executive producer Bob Boyett, are "actively involved," while TV Guide reporter Michael Schneider wrote that stars “Candace Cameron Bure… Jodie Sweetin… and Andrea Barber… are on board, while Bob Saget… and Dave Coulier… are also involved in some way."

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