'Godzilla' trailer provides a glimpse into the monster remake

'Godzilla' stars Bryan Cranston, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, and Ken Watanabe. 'Godzilla' is scheduled to be released on May 16.

Kimberly French/Warner Bros. Pictures/AP
'Godzilla' stars Bryan Cranston (l.) and Aaron Taylor-Johnson (r.).

Filmmaker/special effects guru Gareth Edwards broke out with his (very) low-budget post-alien invasion drama Monsters, but he looks to make a much, much larger splash in the Hollywood pond with his upcoming reboot of the Godzilla franchise – a project that fans of the King of Monsters have been buzzing about for the past two years, going back to the conceptual teaser that Edwards premiered back at the 2012 International Comic-Con (to rapturous applause from Con attendees in Hall H).

Few explicit details have been revealed about the Godzilla (2014) story, which is officially credited to Dave Callaham (Doom, The Expendables) and was scripted by Max Borenstein (Seventh Son), possibly featuring some uncredited revisions by Frank Darabont (creator of The Walking Dead TV series). However, based on Edwards’ suggestions that this film is a proper retelling/modernization of the 1954 nature-gone-wrong movie that started it all, it’s safe to assume that the plot has certain humans – soldiers, scientists, etc. – attempting to stop the eponymous giant monster, while others (see: Elizabeth Olsen’s character) are just doing their best to survive the destructive fallout.

We got a taste of that in the teaser trailer, which shows Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Olsen’s husband in the film and her future Avengers: Age of Ultron costar) and his fellow men in uniform jumping from a plane into the war zone that is a city under attack by Godzilla, along with clips of various other people scrambling to stay alive and/or uncover the truth about this unfathomable force of nature.

A newly-unveiled full-length trailer (which you can watch above) goes a bit deeper in detail, revealing more about the characters in this world – like Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad), who’s determined to learn the truth about what’s happening, and Ken Watanabe (Inception) as an official who knows all too well about the secret history of Godzilla – as well as the newfound threat(s) that they must face.

Sandy Schaefer blogs at Screen Rant.

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