'Downton Abbey' actress Jessica Brown Findlay, Colin Farrell star in 'Winter's Tale' – check out the trailer

'Downton Abbey' actress Jessica Brown Findlay and Russell Crowe star in the film 'Winter's Tale.' Findlay starred as daughter Sybil on 'Downton Abbey.'

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
'Downton Abbey' actress Jessica Brown Findlay and Colin Farrell (pictured) star in the film 'Winter's Tale.'

In 1916 New York, former mechanic Peter Lake has fallen on hard times. Forced to work as a burglar for a criminal syndicate, Lake breaks into an upper-class home – only to encounter a strange, ethereal woman with whom he falls in love.

Little does Peter know that his paramour has been marked for death by demonic forces led by the ruthless gangster Pearly Soames. Peter’s desire to save her kicks off an era-spanning quest in the upcoming romantic fantasy, Winter’s Tale, which has released a new trailer in the run-up to its theatrical release.

This newest preview for Winter’s Tale doesn’t contain much in the way of astonishingly new material, instead opting to streamline the information shared in the film’s first trailer. The preview does expand on the exact role of Pearly Soames (Russell Crowe) in the proceedings, but soft-pedals the film’s supernatural elements until the midway point of the trailer.

Such an approach could indicate Warner Bros.’ uncertainty with how to present the movie’s strange material. Based on the 1983 novel by Mark Helprin, Winter’s Tale is a curious mixture of period drama, romantic melodrama, magical realism, and full-on surrealistic fantasy. If the trailers for the film are uncomfortable with tackling all of these elements, will the film itself be able to encompass them fully?

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