Lisa Edelstein will guest-star on ABC dramedy 'Castle'

Lisa Edelstein will appear in a multi-episode arc as a federal investigator on the ABC show 'Castle.' Lisa Edelstein previously starred on the Fox medical drama 'House.'

Mario Anzuoni/Reuters
Lisa Edelstein will guest-star on the ABC show 'Castle.'

“House” actress Lisa Edelstein is heading to the ABC dramedy “Castle” for a multi-episode arc.

Edelstein’s character for the show’s sixth season will be Rachel McCord, a federal investigator who may play a part in decisions main character Kate Beckett (Stana Katic) will be making about her life. Beckett was deciding whether or not to move to Washington D.C. and mulling what to do about the marriage proposal from writer Richard Castle (Nathan Fillion).

Edelstein will first appear in the sixth season premiere. It was also recently announced that the actress will voice a character on the Nickelodeon animated series “The Legend of Korra.”

Since Edelstein left the Fox drama “House” in 2011, she has guest-starred on various shows including the CBS legal drama “The Good Wife,” CBS’s take on the Sherlock Holmes stories titled “Elementary,” and the ABC soap “Scandal.” She had previously guest-starred on the 1996 TV animated adaptation of “Superman” and on the NBC drama “The West Wing” as well as appearing in the 2000 romantic comedy “What Women Want,” starring Mel Gibson and Helen Hunt. On “House,” Edelstein portrayed Dr. Lisa Cuddy, the administrator of the hospital at which protagonist Gregory House (Hugh Laurie) works as well as the Dean of Medicine.

“Castle” premiered on ABC in 2009 and stars Fillion as a mystery writer who, after being questioned by New York police after a murderer commits a crime that is similar to one of his books, begins to work with detective Beckett (Katic) to solve mysteries. He uses her as the inspiration for a protagonist for a new series of mystery novels.

The show has been nominated for four Primetime Emmy Awards, all for technical categories, such as Outstanding Music Composition.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.