Jack Nicholson, Jennifer Lawrence chat post-Oscars

Jack Nicholson, Jennifer Lawrence, and George Stephanopoulos talked after the Oscars when Nicholson snuck up on Lawrence while the actress was being interviewed by the ABC journalist. Jack Nicholson complimented Jennifer Lawrence on her work.

Matt Sayles/Invision/AP
Jack Nicholson and Jennifer Lawrence (pictured) talked after the Oscars while Lawrence was being interviewed by journalist George Stephanopoulos. 'You did such a beautiful job,' Nicholson told her.

Best Actress winner Jennifer Lawrence had an unexpected encounter with an Oscar legend when she was being interviewed by ABC’s George Stephanopoulos.

Lawrence was chatting with Stephanopoulos when actor and Oscar staple Jack Nicholson, who often attends the ceremony, whether he’s nominated or not, came up behind her.

Lawrence let out a huge gasp when she realized who was over her shoulder, and it turned out Nicholson wanted to let her know he was a big fan.

“You did such a beautiful job,” Nicholson told her of her movie. “I don't mean to crash your interview.”

“Yeah, you’re being really rude,” Lawrence joked.

“You look like an old girlfriend,” the “Shining” actor then added.

“Oh, really?” Lawrence inquired. “Do I look like a new girlfriend?”

After Nicholson left, she buried her head in her hands. “Oh my God. Is he still here?”

Nicholson then popped up in view of the camera again, said, “I’ll be waiting!,” and disappeared.

“I need a rearview mirror!” Lawrence exclaimed.

Lawrence took home the Best Actress award for her work in “Silver Linings Playbook,” and was nominated previously for her work in the 2010 movie “Winter’s Bone.”

She’d also received praise for her graceful handling of an accident in which she tripped on the way to receive her Oscar. When some members of the audience gave her a standing ovation when she reached the stage, she said, “You guys are just standing up because you feel bad that I fell.”

In addition to her other films, Lawrence is currently the head of a young adult movie franchise in her role as Katniss Everdeen, the heroine of the dystopian “Hunger Games” trilogy. The second installment in the series, “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” is due out this November.

Check out the full video of Lawrence chatting with Nicholson.

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