'New Girl': Who's signed on to play Jess's parents?

'New Girl' has signed two actors to play the parents of Jess (Zooey Deschanel).

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
'New Girl' stars Max Greenfield (l.), Lamorne Morris (center) and Jake M. Johnson (r.) as the roommates of Jess (Zooey Deschanel).

It’s time to meet the parents responsible for the quirky cuteness that is Jess Day (Zooey Deschanel) on New Girl, as actress Jamie Lee Curtis and actor/director Rob Reiner have been tapped to play her parents in season 2.

The actors will appear in the series’ Thanksgiving episode as Bob and Joan Day – Jess’ divorced parents whose passion she’ll try to reignite in a Parent Trap-esque scenario. Currently, it looks like both Reiner and Curtis will only be stopping by for the one episode, but a return for the both of them down the line hasn’t been ruled out. 

Curtis – primarily known for such popular films as Halloween and True Lies - will be appearing on New Girl fresh off a multiple-episode arc on CBSNCIS as Dr. Samantha Ryann, a potential love interest for Special Agent Gibbs (Mark Harmon). In a recent interview, Curtis stated that she would be returning to NCIS at a later date.

Meanwhile, Reiner has made appearances on hit comedies like 30 Rock and Curb Your Enthusiasm, but is probably best known on TV for his role as Archie Bunker’s “Meathead”  son-in-law on All in the Family. Since the ’80s, Reiner has spent most of his time behind the camera directing films like This Is Spinal Tap, Stand By Me, The Princess Bride, When Harry Met Sally, Misery, and, more recently, The Bucket List.

Comedian Rob Riggle will also be stopping by for a slice of Thanksgiving turkey as Schmidt’s (Max Greenfield) cousin and mortal enemy, who also goes by Schmidt (hence the bitter feud).

Others joining the cast of season 2 include America’s Next Top Model alum, Keenyah Hill – who will appear in episode 2 as Winston’s (Lamorne Morris) smart, sexy sister, Alisha, a professional basketball player whom Schmidt takes a liking to – and Anna Maria Horsford (the Friday movies) as Winston’s tough-talking mother.

Scott Stoute blogs at Screen Rant.

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