Top Picks: 'Tidying Up,' Meet Vermeer on Google

PBS's 'Margaret: The Rebel Princess' examines her life in relation to the turbulent events of the world in which she lived, sweet dog tale 'Pick of the Litter' is now available on DVD and Blu-ray, and more top picks.

Courtesy of Getty/Popperfoto/FIle

Tidy space

Readers whose hearts were captured by Marie Kondo’s method for decluttering in “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” can now watch the neatness guru in action in her new Netflix series, Tidying Up. Kondo exudes sweetness and charm across eight episodes as she guides clients struggling with a range of real-life problems: chaos with toddlers, empty nesters housing a lifetime of memories, and people overwhelmed by all their stuff. The final reveals aren’t magazine-ready homes, but the relief and joy expressed by those who go through her process are palpable.

Vermeer addition

The Google Arts and Culture app has been around since 2011; you may remember it for a viral face-recognition program that matched selfies to paintings. But the app’s main purpose is to make the world’s artwork widely accessible. One of its newest collections is the complete (known) work of Johannes Vermeer, the Dutch painter famous for “Girl with a Pearl Earring.” In total, 18 museums across seven different countries have contributed 36 paintings to the Meet Vermeer feature.

Princess story

Going through “The Crown” withdrawal? Check out some of the history behind the popular Netflix series with the new PBS program Margaret: The Rebel Princess, which examines her life in relation to the turbulent events of the world in which she lived. “Margaret: The Rebel Princess” debuts Feb. 10 at 10 p.m.

Bean counter

If you’re a student or know one, it’s worth your while to check out the Student Beans app, which is free for iOS and Android. Student Beans has partnered with various brands to give students discounts. You can browse on the app to see which deals are being offered or look up a specific company if you’re already planning a purchase.

Puppy tale

A sweet dog tale is now available on DVD and Blu-ray. Pick of the Litter tells the story of Labradors that are trained for the Guide Dogs for the Blind organization. Monitor film critic Peter Rainer writes, “The best part of the movie is when the few who make it through are introduced to their new owners. It’s love at first touch.” This movie is not rated. 

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