Top Picks: The Stray Birds' album 'Magic Fire,' the movie 'Captain America: Civil War,' and more

Norway's slow TV programming on Netflix is truly relaxing, the Afropop Closeups podcast is an intriguing listen, and more top picks.

Bold birds

The sound of the Stray Birds is the sound of America: bold, open-hearted, and resolute. Their songs and voices jump out of the speakers and simply won’t be denied. This is a band on the rise, bound to span musical genres and make new fans wherever their bus and the radio takes them. Hailing from Lancaster, Pa., the five-piece band is on tour now promoting their stirring new album, Magic Fire. Catch them live if you can and check out a wonderful “making of” video at http://bit.ly/straybirds.

Relaxing tv

Looking for a truly relaxing TV experience? Norway’s slow TV programming on Netflix is guaranteed to soothe you, from “Slow TV: Train Ride Bergen to Oslo,” featuring footage of a train ride (yes, that’s it) to “Slow TV: National Knitting Evening,” which features people knitting and showing off their wares. Search for “slow TV” to see all the selections – it’s slow in the best way.

AP

Aluminum history

You may associate aluminum with the foil in your kitchen drawer, yet the metal has had a profound effect on history. In a recent video, those behind the Real Engineering YouTube channel explore the history of aluminum, from its use in the engine made by the Wright Brothers (pictured) to its essential place in the construction of the Empire State Building. See the video at http://bit.ly/aluminumvideo.

Afropop podcast

The company Afropop Worldwide recently created a new podcast, Afropop Closeups, and a recent intriguing episode looks at the proliferation of Haitian radio in New York City and how some Haitian immigrants have encountered problems bringing their country’s rich radio traditions to the Big Apple. Check it out at http://www.afropop.org.

Superhero fight

The film Captain America: Civil War finds former superhero allies such as Captain America and Iron Man facing off. Actor Tom Holland, who plays Spider-Man for the first time, provides some of the film’s funniest moments, and Robert Downey Jr. as Iron Man is also a highlight. The movie is available on DVD and Blu-ray Sept. 13. 

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