Scotty McCreery survives armed robbery in Raleigh, N.C.

Scotty McCreery, the 2011 American Idol winner, was the victim of an armed robbery at his apartment. Scotty McCreery is a student at North Carolina State University.

Country music singer Scotty McCreery was the victim of an early morning home invasion near the campus of North Carolina State University, where he is a student.

Raleigh Police spokesman Jim Sughrue says officers were called shortly before 2 a.m. Monday to an apartment about a mile from campus. People at the apartment told police that three suspects armed with guns robbed them of wallets, cash and electronic items.

Police said the 20-year-old McCreery was at the apartment visiting friends. No one was injured.

A native of nearby Garner, McCreery won TV's "American Idol" in 2011. He was named best new artist at the Academy of Country Music Awards the next year. In addition to being a recording star and a pitchman for Bojangles' Famous Chicken 'n Biscuits, McCreery is wrapping up his sophomore year of college.

On his Facebook page Monday, McCreery thanked the Raleigh police for "their quick response and hard work" in investigating the case.

"Yes, it was definitely a very scary night," McCreery said. "Luckily, my friends and I are safe and the Raleigh PD is on the case. I will share more when the time is right, but as of now we do not want to do or say anything that could hinder the investigation. Thanks to everyone for the prayers and support."

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Follow AP writer Michael Biesecker at Twitter.com/mbieseck

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribute

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