PS4 games: Four worth waiting for

PS4 games and console sales have gotten off to a blockbuster launch. Now the console just needs a more robust line-up of games. 

Ubisoft
A screenshot from the forthcoming Ubisoft game Watch Dogs, which is expected to be released in 2014.

Earlier this month, Sony released the PlayStation 4, its long-awaited entry in the eighth-generation console market. Sales have been strong: Sony says it unloaded a million PS4s globally in the first 24 hours the device was on sale. Reviews were a little less strong. Although generally admired for its graphics capability, many critics have pointed to PS4's middling line-up of launch titles. 

Luckily, the lifespan of the device is likely to be a long one, full of an array of next-gen titles.

Here are four to watch. 

Uncharted 4

After three installments on the PS3, Naughty Dog's Uncharted series will move to the PS4 with Uncharted 4. Few details are available, although this trailer seems to hint that at least some of the action will take place in Africa.

"Our goal is to continue what we've done in previous console generations and once again deliver the best in storytelling, performance capture, technical innovation and graphics on the PS4," Naughty Dog's Arne Meyer wrote this month on the PlayStation blog. 

Watch Dogs 

This open-world Ubisoft title should have premiered with the PS4. Instead, it was held back to spring of 2014 so Ubisoft could have "the extra time to polish and fine tune each detail." For now, we'll have to be content with previews like this one from Rik Henderson of Pocket-link. The game, he wrote, "really does seem to be living up to the last year or so of hype."  

Thief

Sixteen years after the launch of the first Thief PC game, Eidos is rebooting the series for a range of platforms, including the PlayStation 4. Think Dishonored, mixed with a heaping of the bow-and-arrow mechanics of Far Cry 3. "Visually, the title looks stunning and the game performance was quite solid," Alessandro Fillari wrote in a preview at Destructoid. "It's a very interesting look at what people can expect from next-gen gaming." 

Infamous: Second Son

A follow-up to the popular PlayStation 3 title Infamous, Second Son will be available only on the PlayStation 4. Considering the strong cult following its predecessor inspired, we expect Second Son to help drive a fair number of numbers into the arms of the PS4. 

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