Battlefield 4 among the titles included in Sony's PlayStation 4 upgrade plan

For $10, Sony will allow you to upgrade four games – Battlefield 4, Watch Dogs, Call of Duty: Ghosts, and Assassin's Creed: Black Flag – from the PS3 versions to PS4. 

Electronic Arts
A screenshot from Battlefield 4, a forthcoming action game.

On Nov. 15, Sony will release the PlayStation 4, its highly-anticipated new video game console. Around the same time, a slew of cross-generational titles – playable on the PS3 and PS4, in other words – will hit shelves. For some gamers, this could create some problems. 

For instance, let's say you pick up the PS3 version of Battlefield 4 on Oct. 29, the day that game is slated to launch. Two weeks later, you sell your PS3 and buy a PS4 instead. Your copy of Battlefield 4 is now obsolete, right? Well, not exactly. Under a new program unveiled today by Sony, you're eligible to digitally upgrade to the PS4 version of Battlefield 4 for $9.99. 

Besides Battlefield 4, three other titles are included in the program: Watch Dogs, Call of Duty: Ghosts, and Assassin's Creed: Black Flag.

"Gamers who purchase a PS3 Blu-ray Disc of these four games will find a code packed into the PS3 version that they can redeem on PlayStation Store," Sony's Sid Shuman wrote in a blog post today. "To play the PS4 version of the game when it becomes available, you’ll need to insert the original PS3 disc in your PS4 to activate and play the PS4 version, so hang onto that PS3 disc." 

For complete details, check out this handy run-down

In related news, Sony exec Andrew House has estimated that Sony will sell 5 million PS4 consoles by the end of March of 2014. By comparison, the Sony PlayStation 3, which launched in November of 2006, sold 3.55 million units during a similar time frame. 

"The advantage of PS4 is that we already have a network and community in place," Mr. House told Bloomberg. "More importantly we have services from the launch of the device rather than have them appearing gradually as at the time we did with PS3."

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