iPhone 5S said to be a third faster than its predecessor

Will the new iPhone – dubbed the iPhone 5S by the tech press – be a speed demon? 

Reuters
Apple CEO Tim Cook takes the stage after the introduction of the iPhone 5 during Apple Inc.'s iPhone media event in San Francisco, California, in this September 12, 2012 file photograph. A new iPhone is rumored to be on the way.

The next iPhone could be a speed demon. 

According to Clayton Morris of Fox News, the Apple iPhone 5S will pack an A7 processor approximately "31 percent" faster than the A6 in the current-model iPhone 5. "I'm hearing it's very fast," Mr. Morris tweeted yesterday. 

Does this seem like putting the cart before the horse? Well, in a way it is. Apple has not yet confirmed the existence of a new iPhone, let alone an iPhone called the iPhone 5S. And certainly no specs have been released. But in recent weeks, an array of tech news outlets, including the Wall Street Journal, have reported that a pair of new iPhones – the flagship iPhone 5S and a cheaper model iPhone 5C – will be unveiled on Sept. 10. 

As for the speed, it certainly makes sense that Apple would ratchet up the specs on its next flagship handset, especially considering that the Cupertino company is extremely unlikely to fully overhaul the look and size of the device. (Consider the fact that the radically redesigned iPhone 4 was followed by the iPhone 4S, which looked like the iPhone 4, but packed a far greater punch in terms of speed and power.) 

To that end, several news sites have posited that the next iPhone will be available not only in black and white – standard for past iterations of Apple's smart phone – but also in a gold hue. It sounds a little ... gaudy, but then again, Apple did release a gold iPod mini a few years back, so it doesn't seem entirely out of the realm of possibility. Who knows? Maybe they've still got a few cans of gold paint lying around.

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