UK gets huge new offshore wind farm

An offshore wind farm that promises to be the largest wind farm in the world is under development off the east coast of Britain, according to OilPrice.com.

Michael Heinz/Journal & Courier/AP/File
In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012 photo, wind turbines are silhouetted in the morning sun near Brookston, Ind. Indiana's once-booming wind power industry is facing an uncertain future as Congress debates whether to renew a tax credit that's set to expire late this year.

The wind energy company IBERDOLA has begun the development of the world’s largest wind power project with its partner, the Swedish company Vattenfall. The offshore wind farm will be located off the East coast of Britain, and will have a capacity of 7,200MW, and be able to supply around 5 million UK homes.

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The first stage of the East Anglia wind farm will be the construction of two weather monitoring stations off the coast of Suffolk and Norfolk. The stations will be built by the Scottish company Woods Construction for €23 million, and will be completed next summer. (Related Article: Europe's Offshore Supergrid Plans)

They “will measure the wind speed and direction, as well as temperature and air pressure for an area bigger than Norfolk, which will enable key technical and engineering decisions for the wind farm to be taken. Once they come into operation they will be among the most technically advanced weather facilities in the United Kingdom.”

“The project has the potential to deliver 7,200MW of installed capacity, which is capable of generating enough clean green energy to power 5 million homes and will be one of the world’s largest renewable energy projects.” (Related Article: All You Need to Know About LNG)

IBERDROLA plans to become the world leader in offshore wind farm technology and hopes that this will drive its future growth. “To achieve this goal, the Company’s Offshore Business Division, based in Scotland and offices in London, Berlin and Paris is developing its offshore wind project pipeline of over 11,000 MW across Northern Europe.”
Source: http://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Development-of-7.2GW-Offshore-Wind-Farm-Starts-in-UK.html

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