Oil prices fall as global demand weakens

Oil prices dropped 12 cents to $92.07 per barrel Monday amid expectations for weaker demand. The lag in oil prices showed pessimism over the prospects for both domestic and global demand given weak growth in China, the US, and Europe.

Stringer/Reuters/File
A worker wipes fuel prices from a board as she updates prices at a gas station in Hefei, Anhui province in this February 2012 file photo. Oil prices fell Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 in anticipation of weakening demand in key parts of the globe.

Oil prices fell on expectations for weaker demand after two closely watched surveys underscored enduring global economic weakness.

Benchmark oil for November delivery was down 12 cents to $92.07 per barrel at midday Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 34 cents to finish at $92.19 per barrel on the Nymex on Friday.

Brent crude was down 21 cents to $112.18 on the ICE Futures exchange in London.

Japan's central bank on Monday released a survey that shows deepening pessimism over the economy among the country's big manufacturers.

The Bank of Japan's quarterly "tankan" index was minus 3, a worsening from the previous quarter's minus 1.

The survey showed pessimism over the prospects for both domestic and global demand given weak growth in China, the U.S. and Europe.

Meanwhile, a survey by the China Federation of Logistics & Purchasing said its monthly index of manufacturing activity stood at 49.8 points on a 100-point scale. Numbers below 50 indicate a contraction. China's economic growth fell to a three-year low of 7.6 percent in the quarter ending in June.

Traders are now looking to upcoming jobs data out of the U.S. for a read on the health of the world's No. 1 economy.

"With Wednesday's presidential debates and the approaching election, we expect all eyes will be on Friday's non-farm payrolls data," said oil analyst Stephen Schork in an email commentary.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.