In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, today’s column is a poem that points to the light, peace, harmony, and joy that divine Spirit has bestowed on its entire creation.

Christian Science Perspective audio edition
Loading the player...

Ye can discern the face of the sky; but can ye not discern the signs of the times? – Matthew 16:3

Behold, the Lord passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and brake in pieces the rocks before the Lord; but the Lord was not in the wind: and after the wind an earthquake; but the Lord was not in the earthquake: and after the earthquake a fire; but the Lord was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice. – I Kings 19:11, 12

I.

can you

see the face of the sky?

read the signs of the times?

gauge the tenor of thought?

discern the state of things within?

is there a storm brewing?
floods of fear
waves of rage
hateful righteousness
reaching a boiling point?

we are being called

not to be barometer
for world currents:
suggestion, projection,
manipulation

but to sift real
from unreal
to heed the
still small voice within

Elijah heard it
on the mountain
as he faced
wind
earthquake
fire

and right there –
he heard
the still small voice
of God

stilling the storm
lighting the dark –
peace breaking through

suddenly the world
is seen
as God sees:
safe, intact, assured.

II.

today,
instead of railing,
wondering,
blaming,
being transfixed
by portent of the times

we could,
like Elijah,
make our way higher,
find the center of our hearts –
not turn away,
but turn towards
the face of God

and there in some hush
an assurance –
insistent stillness –
hear, see, feel God, good
embracing the universe
in impartial, impervious
tenderness

here is where we see the face of the sky
discern the real signs of the times
storms find their stillness
fires burn but do not consume
the earth moves in wonder
all things are safe, intact, assured
everything about us
sings for joy.

Originally published in the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 6, 2017.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Still small voice
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/A-Christian-Science-Perspective/2018/0420/Still-small-voice
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe