Commentary A Christian Science Perspective

Healing broken hearts

A Christian Science perspective: Realizing that we can never be separated from divine Love brings genuine peace and a renewed sense of joy.

  • Susan S. Collins

The end of a friendship or a promising romance can feel pretty devastating. I’ve found help in two ideas in Mary Baker Eddy’s book “Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures”: “Human affection is not poured forth vainly, even though it meet no return” (p. 57). And, referring to God as divine Love, “Love supports the struggling heart until it ceases to sigh over the world….”

Can divine Love really heal a broken heart? The Gospel of Mark in the Bible reassures us: “With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible” (10:27).

Once I fell in love with a warm and witty man. He was well read, and we could talk about anything. But despite our common interests, it became obvious we had major differences, and our relationship ended. The dreams, the plans ... dashed!

For a time I really struggled, but I prayed to gain peace, healing. Gradually I began to understand that because God created everyone, He naturally governs and relates all of us to each other and to all that is good. These relations can only bless. I began to feel that I could truly lean on God for guidance and direction, and know that our true keeper had a purpose of good for myself – and my friend.

I learned that although sharing and companionship are a great blessing, the kingdom of heaven – full and lasting happiness – is within each of us, as Christ Jesus taught (see Luke 17:21). We truly live within the consciousness of divine Love, and the tatters of sadness and grief don’t abide there, for us or anyone.

As I became more aware of this spiritual reality, I found I was increasingly joyful, rather than disappointed or lonely. I became more conscientious about watching the kinds of thoughts I was letting in, entertaining, and sending out.

It wasn’t always easy, but this was a time of spiritual growth that turned out to be a great blessing for both me and my friend. The fact is, these types of experiences can enrich our character, draw our thought closer to our Maker, and inspire our efforts to help others. We can go forward and find genuine peace and renewed joy.

​A version of this article aired on the Aug. 31, 2017, Christian Science Daily Lift podcast.

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