Commentary A Christian Science Perspective

The forward march of Science

A Christian Science perspective: Unselfishness and love can bring healing and progress to all fields of endeavor.

Humanity has made tremendous advances over the past century. There is a prevalent thought, however, that in fields ranging from environmental science to technology, destructive forces are ascendant – with potentially catastrophic consequences. And it is said that at least some of these challenges are of our own making.

Is it our destiny to be doomed by our own invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship? No. Each one of those qualities, seen in a spiritual light, reflects the wisdom of God. Our tools for overcoming human challenges aren’t limited, then, to the improvement of material modes, but can come from a more spiritual view of God and His creation.

Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of The Christian Science Monitor, championed improvements in art, invention, and manufacture. But she added that humanity, in its march forward, would do well not to neglect “a more perfect and practical Christianity.”

“It will never do to be behind the times in things most essential, which proceed from the standard of right that regulates human destiny. Human skill but foreshadows what is next to appear as its divine origin,” she wrote. “Spirit is omnipotent; hence a more spiritual Christianity will be one having more power, having perfected in Science that most important of all arts, – healing” (“Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896,” p. 232).

In the words of the Apostle Paul: “For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh: (For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds;)” (II Corinthians 10:3, 4).

Surely the spiritual influences of unselfishness and love are powerful to pull down the destructive forces of greed and fear and bring healing and progress to all fields of endeavor.

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