A Christian Science perspective: Christ is our rock.

Out of all the discouraging news and perhaps difficult personal circumstances we encounter, how is it that we can move forward and not feel shaken by all that is going on? How can we remain steady when the world around us appears volatile and frightening? Through difficult and even violent times, many have not only found stability, but also salvation, through Christ. What is this stabilizing power?

The Christ is often described as the very presence of God’s love for us. This divine message, and its power, was fully expressed in Christ Jesus. In fact, Jesus is consummate proof that the love of God reaches us (see John 3:16). Healing the sick, the dying, the insane, and raising the dead to life, Jesus proved to us that the divine touches our lives.

The Christ, as the spiritual idea of God, has always been present. Referring to the eternal nature of Christ, St. Paul called Christ the Rock that saved Moses and the children of Israel (see I Corinthians 10:4). Even after Jesus, the healing power of Christ continued and still continues to exist. It is the action of Truth within human consciousness. This spiritual force, or divine energy, transforms how we perceive both God and ourselves. The power of Christ is a correcting influence, informing us of our spiritual identity as children of the perfect God. It moves through every receptive heart, causing us to feel its healing impact.

Understanding Christ, Truth, as the eternal message of God, forever reaching us to steady and comfort us, Mary Baker Eddy, Discoverer and Founder of Christian Science, included these lines in her poem “Christ My Refuge”:

And o’er earth’s troubled, angry sea
 I see Christ walk,
 And come to me, and tenderly,
 Divinely talk.

 Thus Truth engrounds me on the rock,
 Upon Life’s shore,
 ’Gainst which the winds and waves can shock,
 Oh, nevermore!"     [“Pulpit and Press” p. 18]

Although sometimes shocking events confront us, Christ empowers us with unshakable courage to overcome challenges to our well-being and progress. The Christ dissolves our fears because it opens our thought to the power of God, good, expressed within us. Through Christ we understand that, as the reflection, or image, of God, we express divine wisdom and intelligence. This intelligence equips us with what we need to know to keep us safe in the midst of chaos or confusion. In this way, God not only steadies us through difficulties but also shields us from harm.

This recognition of God’s sheltering love and protection comes through prayer and our receptivity to the message of Christ. The Psalmist, David, must have felt the inspiration of the Christ when he wrote of the power of God to steady us in uncertain times, “For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his pavilion: in the secret of his tabernacle shall he hide me; he shall set me up upon a rock” (Psalms 27:5).

Within our earnest prayers we hear the Christ tenderly calling to us. It lifts us above whatever storms we encounter to see and experience the power of God with us, guiding us safely and firmly forward in our lives.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.