Black Friday laptop deals: These are the best five

Black Friday is generally a good time to buy a laptop, and these five deals are definitely worth your consideration. 

Isaac Brekken/AP/File
Dell devices on display at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

Having a reliable way to access the internet, get work done on the go, and, you know, play the Sims for days on end is kind of a necessity in this day and age. But reliable laptops are pricy, and the cheap ones fall apart so quickly that replacing them becomes an annual expense. 

Luckily, Black Friday always has some killer deals on laptops. We've already rounded up our top 30 favorite Black Friday deals, told you why you should wait to buy a new MacBook Pro, and called out some great sales on laptops at Best Buy in particular, but we thought we'd give anyone looking to score a new laptop during Black Friday sales a head start. Here (in no particular order) are five laptops deals that are definitely worth your consideration:

Dell Inspirion 11 3000 with 2GB Memory, 32GB storage, 11.6" Display -- $99.99

Where: Dell Home
Was: $199.99
You save: $100
Online sale starts: 6 p.m. E.T. 11/24

With a solid 4/5 rating on PC Mag (whose reviewers dubbed it "excellent") and a crazy-low price point to boot, this is one of the hottest buys of the season. While its small size and low storage capacity aren't going to be a selling point for anyone who relies heavily on apps like Photoshop or Adobe Premiere for work, if you're looking for an ultra portable, no-frills laptop that can get you online, responding to emails, stalking your ex's trip to Maui on Facebook, and running a basic word processor, this is a deal you'll want to scoop on next week.

13.3" Apple MacBook Air with 256GB Hard Drive and 8GB RAM -- $999.99

Where: Best Buy

Was: $1,199.99
You save: $200
Online sale starts: The ad claims you can shop online "all day and night" but Best Buy has yet to clarify what that means. We will update when we know more!

Price-wise, this is as good as you're gonna get for a MacBook Air with those specs. While Best Buy is also offering a slightly less suped-up model of this laptop for $799.99 (down from $999.99), as our tech editor David noted earlier this week, anyone in the market for a MacBook Air likely needs to start at 256GB. While this is pretty minuscule discount, it's a still DISCOUNT ON AN APPLE PRODUCT which is about as rare as a Thanksgiving dinner without any political infighting.

HP Notebook with 15.6" Display, 8GB RAM, 500GB Hard Drive -- $229.99

Where: Staples
Was: $419.99
You save: $190
Online sale starts: 12 a.m. 11/24

A big screen, a lot of memory and a nice, low price point make this laptop an attractive deal for anyone hoping to get a little more use out of their computer. Weighing in at nearly five pounds, it's not quite as portable as some of the other options on this list, but the large, HD resolution screen is perfect for viewing pictures and videos.

Alienware 13 R2 Laptop with GB Memory, 500GB Hard Drive, GeForce GTX 960M and 13.3" Display -- $999.99

Where: Dell Home
Was: $1,299.99
You save: $300
Online sale starts: 6 p.m. E.T. 11/24

With a stunning display, high speaker quality and a comfortable keyboard, this laptop was literally made to deliver the perfect high-def gaming experience. It is a little heavy compared with the other laptops on our list, clocking in at a hefty 7.07 pounds. However, with fast loading speeds, the ability to run Windows 10 and the Xbox app and a super-detailed command center, this is the laptop PC gamers have been waiting for.

Dell Inspiron 15.6" Touch Screen Laptop 8GB memory 1TB hard drive -- $349.99

Where: Best Buy
Was: $499.99
You save: $150
Online sale starts: ???

We're still not totally sold on the necessity of touch-screen laptops, but if that feature is something you're after, this is a good place to start. With an 89% customer satisfaction rating and a solid 1TB hard drive, this is a quality piece of computing hardware that can keep up with even the most seasoned multitasker.

This article first appeared in Brad's Deals.

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