How to find a mattress in 10 minutes

It is possible to find and purchase a great mattress in 10 minutes. How? Look at what is wrong with your current mattress and research online before heading out to stores. 

Bob Leverone/AP/File
Bud Boyles stands among some of the Lincolton Furniture Company's bedroom pieces he has for sale.

Mattress shopping can be kind of a nightmare. There are so many choices. And since the last time you bought a new mattress was probably several years ago, you probably can't even remember how you did it. Is this an all-day shopping event? An endless, store-hopping nightmare?

Finding your perfect bed doesn't need to be a stressful ordeal. In fact, preparation and the right tools will help you find a mattress in less time than it takes to brush your teeth, change into your PJs, and set the sleep timer on your TV. Here's how to find the perfect mattress in less than 10 minutes.

1. Identify Your Current Mattress' Flaws

Before even going to the mattress store, figure out what you want to avoid in your next mattress. Too many coils? Too firm for you and not firm enough for your partner or spouse? Narrowing down your list of current mattress flaws will give you a better idea of what you do want.

2. Do Your Homework

Once you know what you don't want, and have a vague idea of what you do want, it's time to do a basic search online. Check for prices, sizes, and brand names you'd like to see in person. This, too, will cut your actual in-person shopping time way down.

3. Test With a Trust Fall

For every mattress I've ever purchased, this is the sure-fire method I've used to find my ideal mattress match. I stand at the foot of the bed, pretend there are eight sets of trusting arms about to catch me, and I fearlessly fall back. I wouldn't recommend this if you prefer a firm mattress, because, ouch, or if you have pre-existing neck problems, because whiplash. But if you're looking for a soft and cuddly pillow-top, this is all kinds of fun, and only takes one minute of your time.

4. Try Out All Options

If you're looking for a new kind of bed, then take the homework you did and test out firm, pillow-top, adjustable, and Tempur-Pedic mattresses by laying down for one or two minutes on each one. It's kind of like trying on wedding dresses, in that you'll know instantly once you've found "the one."

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