Five romantic (and cheap) hotel deals for Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day is around the corner, and if you want to treat your loved one with a romantic escape and show them what they really mean to you, then book one of these five romantic hotel deals. 

AP Photo/Drew Nash/File
Chocolate covered caramel hearts are laid out after going through the enrober at Daisy's Olde Time Confections Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015, in Twin Falls, Idaho. It's the time of year that owner Mark Huber, who owns the store along with wife Colleen, prepare for the approach of Valentine's Day.

Valentine's Day is synonymous with red hearts, roses, candle-lit dinners, and romantic gestures of all kinds. Unfortunately, despite our best intentions, Valentine's Day usually ends up with a last-minute purchase of some wilting carnations and a promise to go out for dinner in the next couple of weeks.

If you've dropped the ball on the last few Valentine's, then keep reading; we've put together five romantic hotel deals that will save you money and put tiny little love-hearts in your partner's eyes.

This year, treat the one you love to a romantic escape and show them what they really mean to you. With Valentine's Day falling on a Saturday this year, you can bet your bottom dollar that hotels will sell out quick, so we recommend booking this week if you want to ensure you get a room, especially at the rates we've found. And hey, once you've booked, you can sit back and enjoy watching all the chumps desperately flailing for a decent gift.

Island Drive Lodge in the Great Smoky Mountains, TN for $56 per night

Book on Groupon to spend the night at this rustic mountain cabin lodge at the foot of the majestic Great Smoky Mountains ($56 per night, low by $7; expires January 26). Take your sweetheart around the old-time town of Pigeon Forge before heading to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park for a hike or cycle amongst dense forest and waterfalls. Finally, watch the sun set on the perfect Valentine's Day from the park's highest point, Clingmans Dome.

2-Nights at Avista Resort in Myrtle Beach, SC for $153

Visit Myrtle Beach offers a 2-night Valentine's weekend stay at this North Myrtle Beach hotel (from $153, low by $51; expires January 31), ranked in the Top 3 hotels in the area by TripAdvisor. Let the laid back beach atmosphere put you and your significant other in the mood for romance.

2 Nights at The Signature at MGM Grand in Las Vegas, NV from $332

Treat your partner to a luxury break in Sin City with this 2-night Groupon stay (from $332, low by $47; expires January 26). This all-suite smoke-free hotel is the perfect place to impress your special someone and declare your love.

3-Night Stay at Esplendor Breakwater Hotel in Miami South Beach, FL for $1,202

Scroll down to book this 3-night Esplendor Breakwater hotel in Miami's hip South Beach district, as provided by Dunhill Travel (from $1,202, low by $189; expires January 23). This 4-star boutique Art-Deco hotel provides the ideal setting of sun, sea, and romance for your Valentine's weekend.

Manhattan at Times Square in NYC from $109 per night

Take your love to the Big Apple for a Valentine's Day to remember (from $249, low by $15; expires January 25). From a carriage ride through Central Park to a breath-taking view from the top of the Empire State building, New York offers countless opportunities for romance.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.