Amazon extends free-shipping deadline by 1 day

Amazon is courting last-minute holiday shoppers by extending its free-shipping deadline to Dec. 19. Amazon says members of its $99 annual Prime loyalty program can order by Dec. 22 for two-day shipping.

Mark Humphrey/AP/File
Workers move merchandise at the Amazon fulfillment center in Lebanon, Tenn. Amazon is extending its free shipping deadlines by one day to Dec. 19, the company announced Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014.

Amazon is courting last-minute holiday shoppers by extending its free-shipping deadline by one day to Dec. 19.

Orders over $35 are eligible for free shipping. Last year's deadline was Dec. 18. The e-commerce company says members of its $99 annual Prime loyalty program can order by Dec. 22 for two-day shipping.

One-day shipping for items ordered on Dec. 23 costs $2.99 and up for Amazon Prime members. And same day delivery is available in 12 cities on items ordered by 10 a.m. local time for $5.99 per shipment.

Retailers are hoping to avoid shipping snafus that occurred last year while at the same time getting the last-minute online shoppers dollar. Last year, FedEx and UPS failed to deliver many packages in time for Christmas amid an unexpected holiday backlog,  prompting apologies from both companies. 

Wal-Mart said last week the cutoff for orders with standard shipping to reach homes by Christmas is Dec. 19.

The complete details of Amazon's shipping deadlines listed on the website are below: 

Contiguous U.S. Ordering Deadlines

Shipping Speed Ordering Cutoff Date
Free Shipping (Non-Prime) December 19
Standard Shipping December 19
Two-Day Shipping December 22
One-Day Shipping December 23
Local Express Delivery December 24

Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico Ordering Deadlines

Shipping Speed Ordering Cutoff Date
Free Shipping (Non-Prime) - AK and HI Only December 13
Standard Shipping - AK, HI, PR, and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States December 14
Two-Day Shipping - AK, HI, and PR December 15
One-Day Shipping - AK, HI, and PR December 16
You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Amazon extends free-shipping deadline by 1 day
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2014/1216/Amazon-extends-free-shipping-deadline-by-1-day
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe