Nissan recall affects 470K cars, SUVs with fuel leak problem

Nissan is recalling about 470,000 cars and SUVs worldwide to fix a problem that can cause fuel leaks. In the US, the recall covers about 134,000 vehicles with direct fuel injection engines including the Juke SUV from the 2012 through 2014 model years, and the Infiniti M56 and QX56 from 2012 and 2013. 

Morry Gash/AP/File
A Nissan dealership is reflected in the hood of a car in West Allis, Wis. Nissan will recall about 470,000 cars and SUVs worldwide to fix a problem that can cause fuel leaks.

Nissan is recalling about 470,000 cars and SUVs worldwide to fix a problem that can cause fuel leaks.

In the U.S., the recall covers about 134,000 vehicles with direct fuel injection engines. That includes Nissan's Juke SUV from the 2012 through 2014 model years, and the Infiniti M56 and QX56 from 2012 and 2013. Also affected are Infiniti QX70 and QX80 SUVs from 2014 and 2015.

A portion of the recall notice sent to Nissan and Infiniti dealers is below: 

Makes/Models/Model Years:

INFINITI/M56/2012-2013

INFINITI/QX56/2012-2013

INFINITI/QX70/2014-2015

INFINITI/QX80/2014-2015

NISSAN/JUKE/2012-2014

Mfr's Report Date: November 26, 2014

NHTSA Campaign Number: 14V-683

Components:

FUEL SYSTEM, GASOLINE

Potential Number of Units Affected: 133,592

Problem Description:

Nissan North America, Inc. (Nissan) is recalling certain model year 2012-2014 Nissan Juke, 2012-2013 Infiniti M56, QX56, and

2014-2015 Infiniti Q70, and QX80 vehicles. The fuel pressure sensors may not have been sufficiently tightened during production.

As a result, the fuel pressure sensor may loosen with vehicle usage and cause a fuel leak.

Consequence:

A fuel leak in the presence of an ignition source could cause a vehicle fire.

Remedy:

Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will replace the fuel pressure sensors, as necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to

begin on or before January 26, 2015. Owners may contact Nissan customer service at 1-800-647-7261.

Notes:

Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY

1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov. This is an expansion of recall 12V-069

Documents posted by U.S. safety regulators say a fuel pressure sensor may not have been tightened properly. That can cause a leak and fire. No fires or injuries have been reported to Nissan.

Other Nissan and Infiniti models are affected in Japan, North America, Europe, the Middle East, China, Latin America, Africa and other market

Documents posted by U.S. safety regulators say a fuel pressure sensor may not have been tightened properly. That can cause a leak and fire. No fires or injuries have been reported to Nissan.

Other Nissan and Infiniti models are affected in Japan, North America, Europe, the Middle East, China, Latin America, Africa and other markets.

Dealers will tighten the sensors starting in January.

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