Market Basket driver arrested after threatening strikers

Market Basket workers were picketing supermarket chain for firing CEO known for putting workers first. Temporary Market Basket driver waved his hammer at picketers, but no one was injured.

Elise Amendola/AP/File
Shopping carts are arranged forming the initials "ATD" in the parking lot of a Market Basket Supermarket in North Andover, Mass., in support of former CEO Arthur T. Demoulas. He was fired in June by a board controlled by his rival cousin, Arthur S. Demoulas.

Police have arrested a temporary Market Basket driver who allegedly jumped from his tractor-trailer and waved a hammer at workers picketing the supermarket chain's warehouse.

No one was injured in the Friday afternoon incident.

A Market Basket spokesman said the company "condemns the driver's actions" and said the driver and his company have been fired.

Workers loyal to fired Market Basket CEO continue picketing at the embattled supermarket chain's headquarters despite a notice this week from management that headquarters and warehouse workers will be fired if they stay off their jobs.

The workers are demanding the reinstatement of Arthur T. Demoulas. He was fired in June by a board controlled by his rival cousin, Arthur S. Demoulas, and has been negotiating to buy the family-owned company.

The chain has 71 stores in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.

Here's what Monitor guest blogger Robert Reich had to say about Mr. Demoulas, the CEO, earlier this week:

What was so special about Arthur T., as he’s known? Mainly, his business model. He kept prices lower than his competitors, paid his employees more, and gave them and his managers more authority.

In other words, Arthur T. viewed the company as a joint enterprise from which everyone should benefit, not just shareholders. Which is why the board fired him.

It’s far from clear who will win this battle. But, interestingly, we’re beginning to see the Arthur T. business model pop up all over the place.

Pantagonia, a large apparel manufacturer based in Ventura, California, has organized itself as a “B-corporation.” That’s a for-profit company whose articles of incorporation require it to take into account the interests of workers, the community, and the environment, as well as shareholders.

To see Mr. Reich's entire blog post, see Market Basket protests a victory for capitalism for all, not some.

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