Mega Millions winners: Florida pair claim half of a $414 million prize

Mega Millions winners: Raymond Moyer and Robyn Collier have claimed their $207 million prize, the Florida Lottery announced Tuesday. The jackpot was the third largest in the game's history.

Mike Blake/Reuters
This Mega Millions lottery ticket was purchased in San Diego, California December 11, 2013. Half of a $414-million jackpot has been claimed by two Floridians. The other half of the jackpot will go to a Maryland winner who has not yet stepped forward.

A central Florida man and woman who have come forward to claim their half of a Mega Millions jackpot of $414 million say the money will allow them to do all sorts of things including investing, traveling and going to as many Notre Dame football games as they can.

Raymond Moyer and Robyn Collier, both 35, have claimed their $207 million prize, the Florida Lottery announced Tuesday. A one-time, lump-sum payment of nearly $115.5 million was made to the Cobie and Seamus Trust, dated April 21, 2014. Moyer and Collier are members of the trust. The jackpot was the third largest in the game's history.

The winning Quick Pick ticket for the March 18 drawing was purchased at a Publix grocery store on Merritt Island, Lottery officials said. The retailer received a $100,000 bonus commission.

Collier said in a lottery news release that she and Moyer didn't know they had won until the morning after the drawing when the numbers were on the news.

"I paused the TV and ran to get the ticket to double-check the numbers," Collier said. "And when I realized they all matched, I jumped off the couch in excitement and told Raymond we had won."

Moyer said he didn't believe Collier until he saw the store where they purchased the ticket on the news.

"It was definitely a shock, but it is an incredible blessing that will allow us to do many things we would not have had the opportunity to do before," Moyer said.

A second winning ticket was purchased in Maryland. That prize has not been claimed.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.